Nasgaweb Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home » Nasgaweb Forums » Training
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Adam Nelson 22.07m and his training
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Database

scottishheavyphotographs.com Old Celt Equipment

Adam Nelson 22.07m and his training

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
hopefulthrower View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie


Joined: 11/28/07
Location: Ireland
Status: Offline
Points: 71
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hopefulthrower Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Adam Nelson 22.07m and his training
    Posted: 2/12/08 at 2:30pm

Adam Nelson is a very nice guy, I attended a training seminar he gave and met him twice since and spoke to him about his training.

 

He is taller and slimmer looking in person than on TV about six one and hard to judge weight, but very athletic.

 

He would be the best person to talk about this I am sure.

 

He primarily emphasises throwing and working on technique, everything else is about making the shot go farther.

 

He emphasises heavy regular core training with lots of moving and twisting against resistance so he can transfer leg power through the core to the upper body, he does individual core exercises and an abs circuit with lowish rep heavy weight.

 

After this he emphasised flexibility telling me he had a trainer come over to help him work on flexibility alone once a week, after this in priority comes squats, full half partial front back wide medium narrow stance with chains bands slow quick all varieties, then comes incline bench pressing and bands and chains.

 

Then Olympic lifts, then sprints and jumps.

 

He has a strength coach called Rob McIntyre and worked with Charles Poliquin.

 

He believes in structural balance i.e. he emphasis barbell curls and leg curls and all kinds of small body building exercises to prevent injury and maximise his strengths.

 

He changes programs every three weeks and very much puts throwing first, i.e. if he is having a good throwing session he will just lift light weights, or will drop plyos lifting for throwing. If he is tired or sore he will skip lifting and listen to his body.

 

He takes pre and post workout nutrition pretty seriously, eating well and is much organised.

He was coached by and then Bob Weir and then Don Babbitt and he trains/trained with Reese Hoffa and Breaux Greer. He also used to train with my old friend nick Sweeney Irish discus record holder.

 

Adam said he is a fan of the highland games and thought the guys were great athletes.

 

He does not always lift heavy ie somestimes 220lb push presses, 70 and 80kg snatches, but also 4 x 5 x 160kg powercleans !

525lbs incline BP for reps, 39" verticle jump, 700lb plus squats 22.49m PR

Leo
Back to Top
Pingleton View Drop Down
Postaholic
Postaholic

Highland Games' virtually straight legs

Joined: 11/28/06
Location: Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 2747
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pingleton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 2/13/08 at 3:12am
Adam Nelson is a world-class shot putter and Olympic silver medalist. During 2000 and
2002 he was ranked number one in the world by Track and Field News. Core training is
important in every throwing event, and Adam Nelson summarizes his core training
philosophy in this article.



Going into the fall of 1999 almost one year out from the Olympics, I suffered a
minor tear in my right pectoral minor and major. After the doctor diagnosed the tear, he
offered me two alternatives: have surgery and miss the Olympics or dont have surgery,
do aggressive rehab, and maybe youll make it. Id just spent three years of my life
dedicated to the pursuit of my Olympic ambitions. Hello!!! This was a no brainer. What
happened during the next nine months exceeded all of my own expectations.
For years Ive heard how the 21-meter barrier was unbreakable without the use of
performance enhancers. I had no idea. Id never thrown within 30cm of that distance.
But something happened as a result of my pec tear, I was forced to change the way I
approached my training. Obviously heavy benches were out due to the direct stress on
the injury, but so were squats and anything that involved steadying a bar on the
shoulders. That significantly limits what you can do in the weight room. My focus
shifted from training off the track to training on the track. How could I throw without
throwing? (I couldnt throw at this point either) It wouldnt be long till I found the
answer I was looking for: event specific training.
As rotational shot putters, weve borrowed a lot of our technical models from the
discus. Knowing this, I began to look at what the world-class discus throwers stressed in
their training: rhythm, timing, speed, and core strength. Well I already worked a lot on
the first three, but the last one Id overlooked. Sure, I always did my crunches at the end
of the workout, but that only scratches the surface. Hammer throwers have known this
for years. Whats the biggest difference between hammer throwers and other rotationally
delivered throws? The number of turns requires more technical and drill work even at the
highest levels. Because hammer throwers spend so much time developing the rhythm of
their throw, they work their core more than any other thrower out there. You dont have
to stretch the imagination to far to understand the importance of the core. Just look at
Yuriy Sedykhs drill work and weight work.
Anyway, thats how I came to focus on the core during my workouts. Here are three
suggestions you can use to strengthen your core:
1) Save the belts and knee wraps for max lifts only. By using them you are only
training your body to squat incorrectly. Youll have to drop the weight, but youll
be amazed at how much stronger youll feel. And if you ever want to go back to
the belt and wraps for the big numbers, it will only take about four weeks to do
so. Were not training to be great lifters, just great throwers.
2) More is no substitute for quality. Train your mid-section just like you would your
bench or squat or clean. You dont get much out of one set to failure in the
cleans. Dont do this with your core. That said, your abs can and do recover very
quickly from heavy workouts, so dont be afraid to do a little weighted abs work
every workout.
3) Vary the tempo and movements based on the workout. On upper body days I like
to do more static core work. On Olympic lifting days I favor more
rhythmic/multi-dimensional core work. On squat days I prefer twisting and
stretching core work (Ill give you a sample below).
So Ive given you some suggestions, now Im going to give you a sample.
Workout 1: Upper body day core work
Hanging Leg Raises with weight
Decline Crunches with weight
Roman Chair sit ups with weight
Stansions (4 ways for 1 minute each)
Workout 2: Olympic day core work
V-ups with Med Ball
Side Elbow to opposite Knee Bends with Bar
Candlesticks (a very intense form of leg raises)
Standing Bar Twists
Pull Throughs
Workout 3: Leg day core work
Floor touches w/ weight- start with plate above head and do a wind mill-like/side
bend movement touching the plate to the floor by your feet while keeping your
arms fully extended.
Walking Twists w/ weight- arms at 90 degrees or straight out if youre a real man
(Im not). Then, step with the left foot and turn your upper body towards the left.
Repeat to the right.
There are many variations of this workout, but thats the base. You get the right idea.
I like to do 100-150 reps total per workout during most of the season. During the offseason
these numbers may be a little bit higher. Going into major competition Ill cut the
volume in half or more with primary emphasis on the twisting movements.
Anyway, thats about it. Though Ive found several combinations of exercises that work
for me, youll probably be different. Experiment till you find something that leaves you
feeling strong and flexible. Once you find the right combination of core training and
plyometric/sprint training, youll find youll only need to do the weight work to boost
your confidence.
Back to Top
Ryan Stewart View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 11/15/06
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 811
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ryan Stewart Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 2/13/08 at 7:34am
That was a great post Peter! . Need to put that in the article section for sure.
John Gallagher- "MASS MOVES MASS"
Back to Top
Joel Sim View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 9/26/07
Status: Offline
Points: 560
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joel Sim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 2/13/08 at 8:24am
It's a new chapter in my bible
Back to Top
hopefulthrower View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie


Joined: 11/28/07
Location: Ireland
Status: Offline
Points: 71
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hopefulthrower Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 2/14/08 at 8:41am

Adam's approach is common sense, he takes what he needs and uses it, he listens to his body, he puts his ego behind him when training, he lifts light weights a lot, and works on the core and flexibillity.

Most importantly he emphasises throwing, and everything else is only supplemental to that. He said he can normally VJ 35-36" BUT WHEN DOING POWER TRAINING/PEAKING HAS DONE 39"!

He demo'ed some lifts, he is very all round strong, and been world junior and world senior champion, 3 world silvers and 2 olympic silvers, NCAA and US champion indoor and outdoors.

A great guy, and fan of highland games as well.

His approach to training is probably similiar to all smart highland pro's especially with the strong emphasis on core and squats and flexibillity, not to menting THROWING.

I hope this helps, cheers, Leo

Leo
Back to Top
Pingleton View Drop Down
Postaholic
Postaholic

Highland Games' virtually straight legs

Joined: 11/28/06
Location: Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 2747
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pingleton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 2/15/08 at 4:35am

Since there seems to be some interest in Adam Nelson and his training, I thought I might as well add some more observations from Nelson himself to this thread.


nellie
10:29 PST, 10/08/2004

cleans with a catch

I, too, have read the articles that claim there's no real advantage of power clean versus a high pull. Maybe there isn't in theory, but my own experience states otherwise. There is something gratifying, physically and psychologically, about catching a clean. When I high pull, I can use more weight, but my form is never as good as when I catch. Plus, when I catch, my overall bodytiming and awareness improves dramatically. So maybe there are higher risks to catching, maybe there are no true advanatges over high pulls, but the good old fashioned power clean (with catch) leaves me with an overall sense of confidence and strength. And that just makes for good throwing.

nellie
18:27 PST, 01/03/2005

Charles Poliquin


I've trained with Charles for over a year now. In fact,last year I flew to AZ once a month until I could no longer afford to do so. His programs strive for body balance through weight work. You do spend a lot of time training your decelerators and you do spend a lot of time training your accelerators, but the most important thing is achieving body balance. Body balance will prevent many injuries and (theoretically) improve overall athleticism.

In my training with Charles I got REAL strong. Charles' programs will get you very strong, and if you add in some additional stretching they are perfect. Someone mentioned the danger of loss of range of motion or decreasing flexibility when training decelerators. This is a valid concern. In truth, it took me many months of stretching before I regained most of my flexibility. However, in time I learned that it wasn't a problem with the weight work, it was problem with me. It takes a lot of discipline to spend an extra hour every day to stretch out. I wasn't that disciplined until it was almost to late. When I did stretch properly I produced big results (or fouled big results). The lead up to the Titan Games was the only time all last year where I felt I was able to stretch properly and lift properly. There, I threw some big bombs nearly 75'.

Anyway, Charles is pretty amazing. His programs are sweet and simple and no matter what kind of shape I'm in they kick my ass in the best way.

Adam


nellie
22:58 PST, 01/03/2005

Poliquin Philosophies


rather than get into specifics, charles prescribes a version of the "cave man diet." Charles rule of thumb for the diet "if it doesn't run, swim or fly you don't eat it." Apply the underlying philosophy across the board and you end up with protein (meats and poultry and FISH). He, also, allows for dark green vegetables and berries. It's important to rotate sources of protein as well as rotate carbs. Much like your body adapts to the same workout, so to does you digestive system.

Charles, also, does a lot with supplementation. Proper supplementation can help prevent overtraining, restore adrenal glands, and prevent injuries. He'll tell you the most underappreciated supplement on the market is fish oil.

Charles wants most of his strength athletes under 12% body fat and for many at 10%. For those of you who've ever seen someone at a true 10% bodyfat you know how impressive it is. But it's not just for show. There's a reason for it. Perhaps some of the chemists in here can explain the relationship of testorone, cortizol, insulin, and growth hormone, I can't. Anyway, at the right bodyfat, your body produces the ideal amounts of all four of those chemicals. Thus, you recover faster, sleep better (and probably less), wake up refreshed...all that equals better training and better competiting.

Biggest problem, it's very difficult to reach 10% bodyfat for most people. These diets can be extremely difficult to follow because they require a lot of preparation and a lot of cash. When you begin taking your diet seriously, you will notice major changes in your body within the first two weeks. At some point, you become a finely tuned machine. Like any finely tuned machine without proper maintanence (i.e. following the diet) you won't run well. So, introduce changes slowly. However, if you choose to take the plunge and get serious with your diet, I promise it will change your world.

Adam


nellie
01:48 PST, 02/23/2005

biggest mistake most athletes make (young and old)...


Most athletes forget they aren't training to be great lifters, they're training to be great throwers (or whatever other sport/event).

So, Godina does in the weight room what he thinks he needs to be a great thrower. Judging from his record, I'd say he has a formula that works for him.



nellie
14:07 PST, 08/11/2005

To all ringers...(part 1) lon

I'm not sure what I'm going to say here. I'm not even sure where this message is going. I just thought I'd take this opportunity to share with my friends and fans on the ring what's been going through my head the past year.

After the Olympics I was crushed. It was almost the catalyst for a major career change, but for some reason I couldn't leave on that note. A lot of people don't understand why or how I could keep coming back for more after suffering so many public losses, but that's the nature of athletics. That's the nature of sport. Failures, and very public ones at that, are a part of my life. I can't hide from a bad day, just like I won't let a bad performance dictate my future. That's the mark of a true competitor. It also helps to have minor brain damage that results in short term memory loss. At least football was good for something. ;)

There's a lot of speculation as to what happened with my sponsorship. Without getting into any specific details, my wife and I decided that it wasn't good for us. I have no ill will towards my former sponsors. In fact, I support their involvement in track and field. Without them, there'd be no money in the sport and I wouldn't be able to make the living I do now throwing.

This year I decided to make some changes. It took a few months before the eBay auction came to fruition. My hope was to auction myself off to a company outside the realm of the typical track and field sponsors. Though it hasn't resulted in the long term sponsorship I'd initially hoped for, it was a huge success. There are companies in this country that are interested in sponsoring Olympians/track and field athletes, but they don't realize the opportunities are out there. It's incumbent upon every athlete in track and field to think outside the box. Find new ways to attract new sponsors to the individual. Once a company has a vested interest in an individual, they have a vested interest in the sport. This is something USATF and our agents don't realize. It's time for some serious changes, and they are on the way.

Back to throwing...the indoor season began with a personal best. Unfortunately, it was followed by an injury that curtailed all practices, throwing, running and/or jumping from the first of February till the end of the first week in May. Lesson here: Proper diagnosis of an injury will result in the proper and prompt rehabilitation of the injury. In many ways this injury was a blessing in disguise. It allowed me to deemphasize the early outdoor competitions and focus on the time leading up to Nationals and Worlds. Unfortunately, my world ranking will suffer for it, but I'd rather have the medal anyway.

My training this year wasn't to different from years past. I will say I spent more time doing those annoying drills that we all despise so much. There's a direct correlation between drill work and technique. More drills generally equals more consistent technique. The drill work also seems to facilitate a more direct relationship between weight room strength and throwing strength. In the past, I spent a lot of time in the weight room, but the extra strength didn't help in the circle. The muscles weren't trained to execute in the circle. They were trained to execute in the weight room. Perhaps some of the bio-mechanists can comment on the importance of establishing muscle memory patterns. I'm speaking on it from an uneducated stand point.

Okay, I've run out of time for now. I'll post more later.

Adam


nellie
17:02 PST, 08/11/2005

cont'd...part 2

After my first outdoor competition I was thrilled. I'd only had three practices since the Milrose Games in February. It's difficult to not get frustrated, but past experience really paid off. I knew it was better not to force it. Still, with less than six weeks before nationals it's a little unnerving to have only 3 practices under my belt. Master of spin I am (no pun intended), I shifted my emphasis from winning, distances, and comfort in the ring, to the fact that it felt great to throw with no pain. So many people focus on the negative. It's debilitating. Focus on the positive and it's liberating.

With each passing day my technique improved and so did my distances. Unfortunately, so did everyone elses. Again, experience paid off here. I wasn't concerned about winning all the domestic meets, I was focussed on making the world championship team. Some of you may notice I didn't waste a lot of time competing in Europe. These meets are great for your world ranking and your pocket book, but don't always comply with the progression toward a major championship. In my mind there are three meets during the outdoor season that matter: US Nationals, WC's or OG's, and the IAAF Final. Anything outside those three competitions is unnecessary. If you take a competition outside those three, then it must fill some need for your pursuit to the big three.

After Nationals, I took a week off. I didn't touch a weight. I didn't touch a shot put. I think I saw a circle once, but it was from a great distance. I needed to take care of some things in my personal life to clear the path to worlds. Plus, I didn't want to start my build up to worlds early.

My world's build up began on July 3. For the next two weeks, I busted my ass in the circle, on the track and in the weight room. I won't get into specifics. Sorry, I have to keep some secrets but I will say I used some of Poliquin's approach in the weight room combined with Simmons' conjugated method. It worked beautifully, and within two weeks I was within 10% of 1rep max. On the track I began my speed programs: lots of running, lots of jumping, and lots of drill work. In the circle I kept each practice short and sweet. Of course, I do that all year round. I took an average of 7-8 full throws a practice three to four times per week.

I left for Europe three weeks before the World Championships. I wanted to acclimate to the time zone, the weather, and the food. European food is different and my first few days in Europe are always a battle. Unfortunately for me, extra-soft Charmin is not common in european bathrooms.

At this point my lifting volume was cut back, while the other stuff remained constant. I, also, had to be careful with my diet. I didn't want to gain any weight during this time. In fact, I was trying to lose between 1 and 2 lbs per week. Ultimately, I think I left US Nationals (six weeks before worlds) at 268lbs and arrived in Helsinki closer to the shy side of 260. My speed and flexibility are at close to peak level at this weight. That's why I threw well on Saturday. I'm not a power guy, and though my timing still quite isn't there, my foot work was awesome. I'm not bragging here, my foot work across the circle kept me in the game. My timing with my upper body was off. Crazy stuff.

So that's about it. I think this post has run its course.

Adam


nellie
02:34 PST, 10/29/2005

re: early throwing

Unlike a lot of coaches, I don't believe it's necessary to throw year round. The important thing is not to lose the timing. Throwing is stressful on the body. Rather than throw year round, spend a month or two doing lots of drill work and visualization. Make sure you drill and visualize to perfection. Don't be sloppy with it. This time "off" from the throwing allows the body--fingers, wrists, shoulders--to heal from the season. As your body "forgets" how to throw with the shot put, it will learn how to throw without one. When you return to a "real" practice, many of your bad habits will be replaced with all those good things you've been drilling and visualizing.

Happy "off" season to everyone,
Adam


nellie
20:05 PST, 12/09/2005

Re: dreamhuge

The real difference between practice and competition isn't so much in intensity as much as it is intent. In a meet, I'm focused on throwing as far as I can. In most of my practices I'm focused on finding my rhythm and timing in the circle. Practices aren't as visibly intense as a meet because I'm thinking things through, feeling for positions and such. It's much more internal.

As for # of full throws and distance in practice, I take 6-12 full throws in a practice. Only when I'm coming into peak throwing shape will I push for distance in a practice. Otherwise I don't care. Unlike many throwers I practice M-T-Th and Sat.



Back to Top
JISurfer View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: 8/31/04
Location: Polynesia
Status: Offline
Points: 432
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JISurfer Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 2/19/08 at 1:39am
I see how nelson does many different squats in his workouts.  For time's sake, how can one bring in the other squats into a workout as well?  Keep in mind, we don't have all day/every day to lift.  We are just given a time slot, usually Mondays, Wednesday, and Friday from 5-6.  Fridays are usually travel days too, so it tightens time restraints even more.
eh...
Back to Top
Pingleton View Drop Down
Postaholic
Postaholic

Highland Games' virtually straight legs

Joined: 11/28/06
Location: Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 2747
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pingleton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 2/19/08 at 3:42am

I assume that Nelson is rotating the different variations day to day, week to week, and depending on the time of year.  Adam generally lifts four days a week using an upper-body/lower-body split, and presumably does squats of some type twice a week. I have copied a number of relevant posts from Adam's site:  www.throwclean.com

Moderator


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 618

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

It's pretty common to break it down between upper and lower. I like training antagonistic muscle groups (push/pulls) in the same workout.

As a general rule, I'd do my heavier days earlier in the week. IMO, rest becomes more important the closer you get to bigger competitions.
_________________
Adam

Adam
Moderator


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 618

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

Three or four days - it depends on how you break your workouts up and what kind of workouts you are doing. If you're doing four, I'd suggest a heavy day for the first workout and speed day for the second workout.

I consider most Olympic lifts a lower body exercise, although I'll occasionally due jerks on an upper body day.
_________________
Adam



 

Adam
Moderator


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 618

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

Gary-
I do a bit of everything. "Variety is the spice of life." I change my programs quite a bit from month to month to work different angles and points on the power curve. I cover all the olympic lifts.

Adam
Moderator


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 618

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

FYI, Rob has limited access to the computer right now. He's, actually, in Athens staying with Breaux Greer while we work on a training dvd. I'm sure he'll catch up this weekend.

In my experience Jump Squats are rarely if ever done for depth. They are better suited for 1/4's or less. Generally, I use them as a way to stimulate the CNS rather than a strengthening exercise. For example:

Jump Squat 3-4 sets of 6-10 @ 60-100k
Snatch/Clean 5-6 sets of 5

In that scenario the Jump Squats are used to activate the CNS and done in addition to your normal warm-up. The key is to explode upon landing.

The heavier you go the more necessary it is to drop lower on the catch or landing. This prevents back injuries. IMO, this exercise isn't worth the risk.
_________________
Adam

Adam
Moderator


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 618

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

Provided you don't have any back issues, I'd pick front squats and/or box squats.

Rep ranges would depend on the athlete. In-season workouts aren't necessarily about gaining strength, but maintaining strength or, in my case, fooling the body into thinking it's still working in the weight room.

My workouts might look something like this:

Cleans 5x5 medium
Front Squat 4x5 medium
Snatch Grip Deadlift 4x5 medium
_________________
Adam

 

Rob
Site Admin


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 370

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

Back to the original question, I think much of the explosiveness you need will come from sprints, jumps, and oly lifts. There are so many effective variations on what to do in season it is hard to sum it up. If you wanted to try squatting with around 50% for speed, you may want to raise the weight occasionally to still get some stimulation to higher threshold motor units.

Example: (just squats, assumes you are intermediate-advanced)
Meet on week 2 and 3 and 5

Week 1 50% w/band (rest is around 40sec)
12x2
Week 2
8x2 50% w/ band

Week 3
8x2 55% (no band)

Week 4
4x2 at 55% 1x2 at 70%, 1x2 at 80%, 1x2 at 90%

Week 5
8x2 55% and chain

Ect

If you feel slow, either reduce weight room work and increase sprints/jumps or change the focus of your lifts.

I treat box squats and squats as 2 different exercises. I would stick to squats because many people box squat incorrectly. Dont use bands and chains at the same time. As I just explained to someone yesterday, the bottom line when lifting w/lower percentages for speed is to look at the bar speed. If it is slow it is too heavy. It should feel too light when you lift and like you arent doing enough until the later sets.
_________________
Rob

Rob
Site Admin


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 370

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

I am not speaking about Poliquin but I have found many coaches dont know how to teach the box squat effectively and therefore dont even know how to apply it.
I dont know the reasoning behind Poliquin not using the box squat because I have never spoken to him about it but I would assume it would be because of the lack of tension on the quad or more specifically the VMO which is important for knee stabilization and force development from the quad.
For this reason, I dont have anyone use box squats exclusively although they can often take up a large chunk of the training program.
You will find that many top coaches have very different methods to their madness. Louie Simmons is a powerlifter so he is going to use what comes from that background. Poliquin is some kind of weird strength bodybuilder hybrid. I believe one of his mentors was an Olympic lifting coach so he will use what comes from that background. Both produce some serious athletes. There is not enough time or space to implement everything that is effective so sometimes you have to pick and choose.
_________________
Rob
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail < = =text/>  
Adam
Moderator


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 618

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't speak for Poliquin on box squats. I've never spoken to him about this. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the extreme interpretation of the box squat.
_________________
Adam

Adam
Moderator


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 618

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

Rob's more familiar with Westside's philosophies than I am. He recently attended Dave Tate's seminar on their training. So for a detailed answer you'll have to wait for his response.

IMO the basic principles behind Westside are sound for an intensification phase. However, there is a time and place for everything. While you may experience great results in the weight room with their training, you might not experience the same results in the circle or on the fields. Also, strength gains don't always equal neural adaptations. In order to apply new strength you must learn to use it.

That said, I incorporate the conjugated method at various times of the year for my upper body training. I don't like it for the lower body because it takes me too long to recover from a heavy squat workout.
_________________
Adam

Throw Fair, Throw Far, Throw Clean!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message < = =text/>  
Rob
Site Admin


Joined: 19 Feb 2006
Posts: 370

PostPosted:     Post subject: Reply with quote

It is important to remember that Louie designed that stuff for powerlifting. That doesnt mean it wont work for other sports but you need to tone it down. Why? One, you are a thrower and not a lifter and Two, you are not on drugs (I assume). Most of those guys who train at Westside use drugs and dont have a problem talking about it. Sadly, it is what you have to do to compete at their level in an untested federation. This also allows them to peak based on drugs as well as normal methods. So, they can lift the volume that they do, and the load that they do because that is all they do. There is no track work to worry about or throws practice.
Im not trying to take anything away from these guys, many of them are in great shape and contrary to what some people believe, I think they are great athletes. The important thing to remember is that the max effort days are balanced with the dynamic days. Some people do the max effort and not the lighter stuff and eventually burn out. Be ready to adapt. When performing a 3 rep max every week, you have to be ready to walk out when you dont feel it or go lighter. There is nothing wrong with this and it is encouraged. Dave Tate calls this staying audible ready, a term I have stolen and used on many occasions.
So remember, it isnt just maxing out every week. You have to perform speed stuff as well. It is just as important.
Be careful when cutting and pasting programs. People usually end up trying to do too much. A pet peeve of mine is seeing people implement bands and chains with no idea of how to use them. They are just doing it because someone told them it was good and it looks cool.

So this probably will raise more questions than it answered, maybe this topic deserves an article. Remember, it isnt powerlifting but the Westside template can be applied to other sports. I think many athletes could benefit from it. Just be smart with your program design.
_________________
Rob


Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 10.11
Copyright ©2001-2012 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.